The Top Causes of Construction Accidents and How to Prevent Them

Construction Accidents

The construction industry is booming with new buildings going up and existing buildings being renovated. Unfortunately, with its rapid growth, there is also an increase in the number of construction accidents that leave workers injured or killed. According to OSHA, the leading cause of construction site accidents are falls, electrocution, ‘struck-by-object’ and ‘caught-in/between.’ These are considered the “fatal four” construction accidents.

Falls: Construction work involves workers climbing to great heights. Falls account for the most injuries and deaths at construction sites every year. These accidents may be caused by portable ladders, unguarded steel rebars, wall openings, unprotected edges and floor holes.
Prevention

  • Employers must provide guard rails and toe-boards around every elevated platform.
  • Employers must use safety harnesses, safety nets, stair railings and hand rails.
  • Employers must provide the required personal protective equipment to workers and train workers about job hazards.

Electrocution: Electrocution is another leading cause of construction-related injuries and deaths. Power lines, inadequate grounding and faulty power cords are some of the most common reasons for electrocutions at construction sites.
Prevention

  • Employers should identify electrical hazards and post adequate warning signs.
  • Workers should never use faulty machinery or power tools that require electricity.
  • Employers must provide safety training and make sure that employees use proper personal protective equipment (PPE) at all times.

Struck by object: ‘Struck by obect’ injuries occur when workers are hit by vehicles or flying objects at construction sites. ‘Struck by object’ accidents happen very suddenly and leave very little time for workers to react and move out of the way.
Prevention

  • Employees must avoid areas where work is being performed above them.
  • Employees musts wear hard hats at all times while on the construction site.
  • Employees must avoid overloading heavy lifting machines beyond their capacity.

Caught-in/between: ‘Caught-in/between’ accidents happen when a worker’s body parts are caught, crushed or squeezed between two or more objects, such as unguarded machinery and equipment rollovers.
Prevention

  • Employees must familiarize themselves with equipment to know where the pinch, sheer, wrap and crush points are located.
  • Employees must shut down equipment before doing repairs or inspections.
  • Employers must encourage employees to wear close-fitting clothing and pull back long hair into a bun.

If you or someone you love has been injured in a construction accident, our construction accident attorneys can help. We have been helping victims of accidents and negligence in the Tri-State area recover millions of dollars in verdicts and settlements. To speak to one of our construction accident attorneys, call 866-700-0657 or email fdervishi@dervishilaw.com.

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